Signals Latest/DSA

The Highway Code THE OFFICIAL HIGHWAY CODE
Signals
The Highway Code applies to England, Scotland and Wales. It’s essential reading for everyone. Here’s a reminder about signals.
Rule 103Signals warn and inform other road users, including pedestrians (see ‘Signals to other road users’), of your intended actions. You should always:

  • give clear signals in plenty of time, having checked it is not misleading to signal at that time
  • use them to advise other road users before changing course or direction, stopping or moving off
  • cancel them after use
  • make sure your signals will not confuse others. If, for instance, you want to stop after a side road, do not signal until you are passing the road. If you signal earlier it may give the impression that you intend to turn into the road. Your brake lights will warn traffic behind you that you are slowing down
  • use an arm signal to emphasise or reinforce your signal if necessary. Remember that signalling does not give you priority

Road junctions & Olympics

Latest Info from the Driving Standards agency, reminding you about how to deal with junctions in case you need a refresher. Check your friends and family are up to date with their highway code. Good topic of conversation if you’re feeling bored or at a loose end after the Olympics. Worth remembering some of the Para- Olympic athletes may be as they are because of a lack of road safety. If you’re near the National Arboreatum check out the wood dedicated to Road traffic Accident victims. It’s well worth a visit.

The Highway Code THE OFFICIAL HIGHWAY CODE
Road junctions
The Highway Code applies to England, Scotland and Wales. It’s essential reading for everyone. Here’s a reminder about road junctions.
Rule 170Take extra care at junctions. You should

  • watch out for cyclists, motorcyclists, powered wheelchairs/mobility scooters and pedestrians as they are not always easy to see. Be aware that they may not have seen or heard you if you are approaching from behind
  • watch out for pedestrians crossing a road into which you are turning. If they have started to cross they have priority, so give way
  • watch out for long vehicles which may be turning at a junction ahead; they may have to use the whole width of the road to make the turn
  • watch out for horse riders who may take a different line on the road from that which you would expect
  • not assume, when waiting at a junction, that a vehicle coming from the right and signalling left will actually turn. Wait and make sure
  • look all around before emerging. Do not cross or join a road until there is a gap large enough for you to do so safely.

Mobile phone & in-vehicle technology & Driving?? Latest reminders.

The Highway Code THE OFFICIAL HIGHWAY CODE
Mobile phones and in-vehicle technology

Remember if it’s written in red it’s a law!

So you could be prosecuted for it!

 

The Highway Code applies to England, Scotland and Wales. It’s essential reading for everyone. Here’s a reminder about mobile phones and in-vehicle technology.

Rule 149

You MUST exercise proper control of your vehicle at all times. You MUST NOT use a hand-held mobile phone, or similar device, when driving or when supervising a learner driver, except to call 999 or 112 in a genuine emergency when it is unsafe or impractical to stop. Never use a hand-held microphone when driving. Using hands-free equipment is also likely to distract your attention from the road. It is far safer not to use any telephone while you are driving or riding – find a safe place to stop first or use the voicemail facility and listen to messages later.

Rule 150

There is a danger of driver distraction being caused by in-vehicle systems such as satellite navigation systems, congestion warning systems, PCs, multi-media, etc. You MUST exercise proper control of your vehicle at all times. Do not rely on driver assistance systems such as cruise control or lane departure warnings. They are available to assist but you should not reduce your concentration levels. Do not be distracted by maps or screen-based information (such as navigation or vehicle management systems) while driving or riding. If necessary find a safe place to stop.